Carolina Hash (2008)

About the Film

The true origins of CAROLINA HASH can be traced to the Carolina rice kitchens on plantations where black food artisans were required to make the most of the lesser parts of the hog at slaughter. They created a high-protein, thick ďmeat-gravyĒ flavored with hot spices familiar to their palate ladled over rice to provide energy for the rigorous labor required in working the rice fields.

Today in the Upcountry from border-to-border you will find a beef-based hash with a twang thatís different from the pork hash found with the Midlands and Low County with their variety of seasonings and secret ingredients. These traditions, in many restaurants and in the hash houses on many farms or churchyards or Volunteer Fire Departments, have been "Grandfathered-in", using black iron kettles in which many decades of hash traditions by local hash-masters occur. But as the documentary shows as it pursues the mission of folk heritage preservation, these traditions are rapidly disappearing.

This documentary tells the story of the SC hash tradition in hopes that a new generation of South Carolinians who did not originate from here will come to appreciate the uniqueness and artisanship that is in CAROLINA HASH.

Stan Woodward Lifeworks Collection of Southern Cultureand Folklife Documentaries

Awards

CINE Golden Eagle

Licensing

For licensing, film rights and permissions, contact Stan Woodward, the distributor Woodward Studio, or Folkstreams.

Film Details

  • Film by: Stan Woodward
  • Produced by: Stan Woodward
  • Cinematographer: Stan Woodward
  • Sound: Stan Woodward
  • Editor: Stan Woodward
  • Other Credits: John Larrabee, The Sidetrack Band, Three Legged Dog String Band, The Swingin Medallions,
  • Funding: South Carolina Arts Commission's Folklife & Traditional Arts Program, The Museum, Friends of Carolina Hash
  • Original Format: DVCam: Sony
  • ©
  • 56 mins, Color
  • Categories:
    African American CultureFoodwaysRegional